Friday, May 25, 2018

Before And After Aerial Images Show The Destruction Of Kilauea's Eruption




Shocking before and after aerial images show the destruction Kilauea's eruption



  • Before and after aerial images show destruction the volcano has inflicted on Leilani Estates neighborhood
  • National Guard released video of the Kilauea volcano as they continued to monitor the dangerous lava flow
  • Members of the National Guard monitored the lava flow as it neared Puna Geothermal Venture power plant
  • Production wells at the plant were finally plugged on Wednesday to prevent toxic gases from seeping out 
  • Ten wells were 'quenched' by cooling them with enough cold water to counter the pressure of volcanic steam
  • The last well was plugged with mud, because it had remained hot despite the infusion of water, officials said 
  • County officials are monitoring gases in the atmosphere and could order an evacuation if they spike 
  • The Nevada-owned plant harnesses heat and steam from the earth's core to spin turbines that generate power


Shocking before and after aerial images show the destruction Kilauea's eruption has inflicted on Hawaii neighborhoods as the National Guard continues to monitor the dangerous lava flow. 
Members of the National Guard released stunning aerial footage of the Kilauea volcano Tuesday morning as the lava flow neared the Puna Geothermal Venture power plant.
Production wells at the plant were finally plugged on Wednesday to prevent toxic gases from seeping out.
Lava from a volcanic vent nearby entered, then stalled, on the 815-acre property where the power plant wells occupy about 40 acres.
Residents have been concerned about hazards if the lava flowed over the plant's facilities, or if heat generated would interact with various chemicals used on-site.


Members of the National Guard released stunning aerial footage of the Kilauea volcano Tuesday morning as the lava flow neared the Puna Geothermal Venture power plant. Production wells at the plant were finally plugged on Wednesday to prevent toxic gases from seeping out



This satellite photo shows lava coming out of fissures caused by Kilauea volcano, near the Puna Geothermal Venture, a geothermal energy plant, in Pahoa, Hawaii

 The wells at the Puna Geothermal Venture plant were plugged overnight as lava from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano inched closer to the site. The plant is pictured above on Tuesday 




This image released by the USGS shows a lava fissure on Tuesday. Lava has been spouting on the island for the past three weeks 




Kilauea's summit is now belching 15,000 tons of the gas each day up from 6,000 tons daily prior to the May 3 eruption




Scientists say lava from Kilauea is causing explosions as it enters the ocean, which can look like fireworks. 
When lava hits the sea and cools, it breaks apart and sends fragments flying into the air, which could land on boats in the water, said US Geological Survey scientist Wendy Stovall.
Underscoring the eruption's dangers, a Hawaii man was hit by a flying piece of lava over the weekend said the molten rock nearly sheared his leg in half.
Darryl Clinton told the Honolulu television station KHON that he was on the roof of a home helping to put out fires from flying rocks when an explosion several hundred yards away launched a 'lava bomb' that him above the ankle.
Clinton said doctors saved his leg, but he must avoid putting weight on it for six weeks. Clinton was the first person to suffer a major injury because of the eruption.
And there appears to be no end in sight, as the USGS announced a new lava flow Wednesday morning.
'Note a new lava flow that was observed during this morning's overflight west of the active channels,' the agency wrote on Facebook.


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