Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Northern Hemisphere In Danger As Fukushima Radiation Spikes To 'Unimaginable' Levels,




Northern Hemisphere Potentially in Great Danger as Fukushima Radiation Spikes to 'Unimaginable' Levels




Radiation inside one of the damaged reactors at the Fukushima nuclear power facility has reached an "unimaginable" level, according to experts. Because so much nuclear material from Fukushima escaped into the Pacific Ocean, there are many scientists who believe that it was the worst environmental disaster in human history, but most people in the general population seem to think that since the mainstream media really doesn't talk about it anymore that everything must be under control. Unfortunately, that is not true at all. In fact, PBS reported just last year that "it is incorrect to say that Fukushima is under control when levels of radioactivity in the ocean indicate ongoing leaks." And now we have just learned that the radiation level inside reactor 2 is so high that no human could possibly survive being exposed to it.

According to the Japan Times, the level of radiation inside the containment vessel of Reactor 2 is now estimated to be "530 sieverts per hour":

The radiation level in the containment vessel of Reactor 2 at the crippled Fukushima No. 1 power plant has reached a maximum of 530 sieverts per hour, the highest since the triple core meltdown in March 2011, Tokyo Electric Power Co. Holdings Inc. said.
Tepco said on Thursday that the blazing radiation reading was taken near the entrance to the space just below the pressure vessel, which contains the reactor core.
The high figure indicates that some of the melted fuel that escaped the pressure vessel is nearby.
It is hard to find the words to convey how serious this is.
If you were exposed to a radiation level of just 10 sieverts per hour, that would mean almost certain death. So 530 sieverts per hour is simply off the charts. According to the Guardian, this recent measurement is being described by scientists as "unimaginable."

The recent reading, described by some experts as "unimaginable", is far higher than the previous record of 73 sieverts an hour in that part of the reactor.
A single dose of one sievert is enough to cause radiation sickness and nausea; five sieverts would kill half those exposed to it within a month, and a single dose of 10 sieverts would prove fatal within weeks.

And the really bad news is that there appears to be a two-meter hole that was created by melted nuclear fuel "in the metal grating under the pressure vessel in the reactor's primary containment vessel." The following comes from Bloomberg:
If that isn't frightening enough, one Japanese news source is reporting that this melted nuclear fuel "has since come in contact with underground water flowing from the mountainside."
The melted fuel has since come in contact with underground water flowing from the mountain side, generating radioactively contaminated water every day. In order to dismantle the reactor, it is necessary to take out the melted fuel, but high radiation levels inside the reactor had hampered work to locate the melted debris.

If this disaster was just limited to Japan, the entire northern hemisphere would not be at risk.
But that is not the case.
Most of the nuclear contamination from Fukushima ended up in the Pacific Ocean, and from there it was literally taken around the rest of the planet. The following was reported by PBS.
More than 80 percent of the radioactivity from the damaged reactors ended up in the Pacific—far more than reached the ocean from Chernobyl or Three Mile Island. Of this, a small fraction is currently on the seafloor—the rest was swept up by the Kuroshio current, a western Pacific version of the Gulf Stream, and carried out to sea where it mixed with (and was diluted by) the vast volume of the North Pacific.

We don't know if there is a connection, but it is extremely interesting to note that fisheries up and down the west coast of the United States are failing because of a dramatic decrease in fish populations. Just check out the following excerpt from a story posted on January 18:
Things are particularly bad up in Alaska, and biologists are "stumped" as to why this could be happening.

In 2016, the pink salmon harvests in Kodiak, Prince William Sounds, Chignik and lower Cook Inlet came in woefully under forecast and stumped biologists as to why.
The estimated value of Kodiak's 2016 haul was $2.21 million, compared to a five-year average of $14.64 million, and in Prince William Sound the ex-vessel value was $6.6 million, far less that the $44 million five-year average. The total state harvest was the smallest since the late 1970s.
Although state biologists weren't ready to declare a cause for the poor pink salmon performance, the Commerce Department press release attributed the disasters to "unusual ocean and climate conditions."
Further south, it was being reported last month that millions of dead sardines are washing up on the shores of Chile.
I could go on and on with many more examples like this, but hopefully you get the point.
Something really strange is happening in the Pacific, and a lot of people believe that there is a link to Fukushima.
Not too long ago, I wrote about how the elite of Silicon Valley are "feverishly prepping," but the truth is that all of us should be. If you need some tips on how to get started, you can find my prepping book right here. Our planet is becoming increasingly unstable, and the Fukushima nuclear disaster is just one piece of the puzzle.
Sadly, this crisis is going to be with us for a very, very long time.
According to Bloomberg, they are not even going to start removing melted nuclear fuel from these reactors until 2021, and it is being projected that the overall cleanup "may take as long as 40 years."





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